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Note- All the weapon 'My arsenal' contain weapons that this site have not. I just want the people to know about these kind of weapons.I will keep adding weapons to these list so keep visiting this page!!! I will try add weapons every day ,please help me by sending some names of ancient weapons in the comments I promise that they WILL be in this list.

Talwar

Talwar

Talwar is a Indian sword used by many Indian warriors .It is a very common sword of Indian warriors.

Description

The talwar originated alongside other curved swords such as the Arab saif, the Persian shamshir, the Turkish Kilij and the Afghan pulwar,all such swords being originally derived from earlier curved swords developed in Turkic Central Asia. The use of talwar became more widespread under the Mughal Dynasty.The Mughal Emperor Akbar is known to have built large foundries producing the best quality sword blades.

Uses

The talwar was used by both cavalry and infantry. The grip of the talwar is cramped and the prominent disc of the pommel presses into the wrist if attempts are made to use it to cut like a conventional sabre. These features of the talwar hilt result in the hand having a very secure and rather inflexible hold on the weapon, enforcing the use of variations on the very effective "draw cut". The fact that the talwar does not have the kind of radical curve of the shamshir indicates that it could be used for thrusting as well as cutting purposes.


Trivia

  • Talwar was the sharpest sword of south ever used and one of the sharpest in the world.(hear me katana fans sharpest sword in south Asia which also include japan ,nothing personal it's only a fact )
  • Talwar was so common in India that now 'talwar' in Hindi means sword or saber.

Pata

Pata

Pata is an Indian sword with a gauntlet integrated as a hand-guard.

Description

Traditionally, Maratha warriors were trained to fight with dual patas by bearing one in each hand.Alternatively, a single pata was used in addition to a belt, javelin, or axe in the other hand. This combination of dual weapons was referred to as dand pata.. The founder of the Maratha Empire --- Shivaji --- was reputedly trained in the art of fighting with pata.

Uses

Ranging in length from 10-44 inches, it was considered to be a highly effective weapon for infantrymen against heavily armored cavalry. Folklore has it that a maratha soldier would use the dand pata when encircled, so as to maximize the casualties on the opposition, before he fell he Rajput warriors are known to have used this weapon very effectively during the Mughal period.

Trivia

  • It is said that it has been developed by the design of Katar.
  • The Mughals also developed a variation of the pata with matchlock pistols adjoining the handle.

Wind and fire wheels

Wind and fire wheel

A pair of wind and fire wheels

Wind and fire wheel are melee weapon , wielded as a pair, associated with Chinese martial arts.

Description

Each wheel is a flat metal ring approximately 38 cm (about 15 inches) in diameter. One quarter-segment has a padded grip with a cross-guard; the other three segments have protruding flame-styled blade.

Uses

With one wheel in each hand, the practitioner can slash, stab, parry, or disarm an opponent.

Trivia

  • In the mythological story Fengshen Yany, the Immortal Tiayi gave Nezha a wind-wheel and a fire-wheel. These were tread on whilst chanting incantations, to serve as a magic vehicle.

Quarterstaff

Quarterstaff is a traditional European pole weapon and a technique of stick fighting,
Quarterstaff
especially as in use in England during the Early Modern period.

Description

The term is generally accepted to refer to a staff of hardwood from 6 to 9 feet (1.8 to 2.7 m) long, sometimes with a metal tip, ferrule, or spike at one or both ends. The term "short staff" compares this to the "long staff" based on the pike with a length in excess of 11 to 12 feet (3.4 to 3.7 m).The name "quarterstaff" is first attested in the mid-16th century. The "Quarterstaff" probably refers to the means of production, the staff being made from hardwood of a tree split or sawed into quarters (as opposed to a staff of lower quality made from a tree branch)

Uses

During the 16th century quarterstaves were favored as weapons by the London Masters of Defense. Richard Peeke, in 1625, and Zachary Wylde, in 1711, refer to the quarterstaff as a national English weapon. By the 18th century the weapon became popularly associated with gladiatorial prize playing. A modified version of quarterstaff fencing, employing bamboo or ash staves and protective equipment adapted from fencing, boxing and cricket was revived as a sport in some London fencing schools and at the Alder shot Military Training School during the later 19th century.

A simplified form of quarterstaff fencing and training was practiced by members of the international Boy Scouts during the early decades of the 20th century; this was a tradition passed down to them from the military activities in the Victorian army. However, the Quarterstaff section was omitted from the Boy Scout Handbook in the 21st century due to health risks and reluctance to promote violence.

Trivia

  • The quarterstaff is also mentioned in England's legend of Robin hood.

Gada

Gada is a Indian heavy mace.
Gada mace

Description

Gada is a super heavy mace used in India. It is able to break bones of enemies in one single hit . It is made up of metals like bronze ,iron and sometimes with even gold. It's length is about 3 - 4 feet and it's weight is about 35 - 45 pounds.

Uses

It was normally used by infantrymen. It was mainly used to strike on the enemy and the spike on the mace-head is used to stab the enemy .It can easily break the bones of the enemies even if they have wore armors like plate armor. It can easily penetrate armors.

Trivia

  • In Hindu mythology the gada is carried by the monkey God Hanuman.
  • The name of Indian martial art Gatka has been derived from the word Gada.

Falchion

Falchion

Falchion is a one-handed, single-edged sword of Europe.

Description

The weapon combined the weight and power of an axe with the versatility of a sword. Falchions are found in different forms from around the 11th century up to and including the sixteenth century. The blade designs of falchions varied widely across the continent and through the ages. They almost always included a single edge with a slight curve on the blade towards the point on the end and most were also affixed with a quilloned cross-guard for the hilt in the manner of the contemporary arming swords. Unlike the double-edged swords of Europe, few actual swords of this type have survived to the present day; fewer than a dozen specimens are currently known.

Uses

It sometimes presumed that these swords had a lower-than-average quality and status than the longer, more expensive swords. It is also possible that some falchions were used as tools between wars and fights, since they were very practical pieces of equipment. However, while it is commonly thought that falchions were primarily a peasant's weapon this is certainly a misconception. The Conyers falchion clearly belonged to a landed family, and the weapon is commonly shown in illustrations of combat between mounted knights. Some later falchions were very ornate and used by the nobility. In particular, there is a very elaborately engraved and gold plated falchion from the 1560s in the Wallace Collection.

Trivia

  • There are two basic type of falchion - (1) Cleaver falchion (2) Cusped falchion.
  • The falchoin is one of the few single-edged sword found in Europe.

Tepoztopilli

Tepoztopilli

The tepoztopilli was a common front-line weapon of the Aztec military.

Description

The tepoztopilli was a pole-arm, and to judge from depictions in various Aztec codices it was roughly the height of a man, with a broad wooden head about twice the length of the users' palm or shorter, edged with razor-sharp obsidian blades which were deeply set in grooves carved into the head, and cemented in place with bitumen or plant resin as an adhesive. This made the weapon vaguely similar to the maquahuitl or "macana", however it had a much smaller cutting edge and a longer handle. This gave the weapon a superior reach, but blows had to be more carefully executed.

Uses

Halfway between a halberd and a spear, the tepoztopilli was equally useful for slashing and thrusting. Conquistador Bernal Díaz del Castillo mentions that on one occasion his armour was pierced by an Aztec lance and that only his thick cotton underpadding saved his life.

Trivia

  • Unfortunately, the last authentic tepoztopilli was destroyed in a fire in 1884 in the Armería Real in Madrid where it was housed.

Kama

Kama is a traditional Filipino and Japanese farming implement similar to a small scythe used for
Kama

A pair of Kama blades

reaping crops and also employed as a weapon.

Description

Before being improvised as a weapon, the kama was widely used throughout Asia to cut crops, mostly rice. It is found in many shapes and forms in Southeast Asia and is particularly common in martial arts from Indonesia and the Philippines. It is also used in Chinese martial arts but not often. From one or both of these areas, the kama was brought to Okinawa and incorporated into the martial art of te (hand) and later karate (empty hand).

Uses

The kama can be used singly or in pairs. Both the point and sharpened edge of the metal blade are called in to use, Okinawan kata suggesting that it could also be used to block, trap and disarm an opponent's weapon. The point at which the blade and handle join in the "weapon" model normally has a nook with which a staff can be trapped. The edge of a traditional rice sickle, such as one would purchase from a Japanese hardware store, continues to the handle without a notch, as this is unneeded for its intended use. The hard edge of the blade would be kept razor-sharp to enable efficient cutting of crops, though this is sometimes a cause of training accidents by unskilled wielders, for whom blunt training versions of the weapon are created. This weapon not only is very sharp and can inflict damage, but is also said to hold a fear factor against the opponent.

Zweihander

Zweihander

Zweihander is a two-handed sword primarily of the Renaissance.

Description

The Zweihänder swords develop seamlessly out of the German "Langschwert" (longsword) of the Late Middle Ages, and they became a hallmark weapon of the German Landsknechte from the time of Maximilian I (d. 1519) and during the Italian Wars of 1494–1559. The Goliath Fechtbuch (1510) shows an intermediate form between longsword and Zweihänder

These swords represent the final stage in the trend of increasing size started in the 14th century. In its developed form, the Zweihänder has acquired the characteristics of a polearm rather than a sword. Consequently, it is not carried in a sheath, but across the shoulder like a halberd. By the second half of the 16th century, these swords had largely ceased to have a practical application, but they continued to see ceremonial or representative use well into the 17th century. Some ceremonial zweihander, called "bearing-swords" or "parade-swords" (Paratschwert), were much larger, weighing about 10 pounds.

Uses

The weapon is mostly associated with either Swiss or German mercenaries known as Landsknecht, and their wielders were Doppelsöldner. However, the Swiss outlawed their use, while the Landsknecht kept using them till much later. The Black Band of German mercenaries (active during the 1510s and 1520s) included 2,000 two-handed swordsmen in a total strength of 17,000 men. Zweihander wielders fought with and against pike formations. There are some accounts of Zwiehanders cutting off pike heads. Soldiers trained in the use of the sword (the title Meister des langen Schwertes was granted by the Marx brotherhood).

Trivia

  • Frisian hero Pier Gerlofs Donia is reputed to have wielded a Zweihänder with such skill, strength and efficiency that he managed to behead multiple people with it in a single blow. The Zweihänder ascribed to him is, as of 2008, on display in the Frisian museum. It has a length of 213 cm (84 in) and a weight of about 6.6 kg (14½lb).
  • Some Zweihanders had wavy blades and were called Flammenschwert.

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